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ARIA in the News

NASA Map Reveals a New Landslide Risk Factor

October 18, 2019

A man retrieving coconuts from a home destroyed by landslides, with damaged rice paddies in the background. Credit: European Union/Pierre Prakash, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

In the deadly 2018 earthquake in the Indonesian city of Palu, intense shaking changed solid ground into a landslide of flowing mud, multiplying the death toll and economic impact. A new paper shows that this disastrous effect was triggered by a previously unknown risk factor: flooding rice fields for farming.

Soil liquefaction, which causes this kind of landslide, occurs when the shaking from a large earthquake rips through moist, loose soil, overpowering the friction that normally holds dirt particles together. The soil loses its structural integrity and begins to flow like a liquid. Buildings fall as their support washes away. Heavy objects like cars sink into the muck, while buried water and sewer pipes rise to the surface.

In Palu, although early reporting blamed most of the estimated 2,000 fatalities on a tsunami, surveys soon showed that soil-liquefaction landslides caused at least as much damage as the ocean waves did. That puzzled researchers. Soil liquefaction usually occurs in flat landscapes with wet, sandy or silty ground, such as coastal plains. Researchers had thought flat terrain was a prerequisite because the water table - the distance below ground where the soil becomes saturated with water - must be shallow, and that's rare on a hillside. Palu has sandy soil, but it's in a gently sloping valley that appeared to pose little risk....

NASA's ARIA Team Maps Flooding in the Bahamas

September 3, 2019

NASA's ARIA team used satellite data acquired on Sept. 2, 2019, to map flooding in the Bahamas in the wake of Hurricane Dorian. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech, ESA, EOS

While many NASA missions are tracking Hurricane Dorian as the storm makes its way toward the United States, some researchers are looking at what Dorian has already left behind.

The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, in collaboration with the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS), used synthetic aperture radar data from the European Union's Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellites to produce this flood map of the Bahamas. The light blue color indicates areas that were likely flooded when the data were acquired on Sept. 2, 2019. In particular, the map shows flooding in and around Marsh Harbour in the Abaco Islands.

The map covers an area of about 109 miles by 106 miles (176 kilometers by 170 kilometers) shown by the large red polygon. Each pixel measures about 32 yards (30 meters) across. Authorities and responders can use flood maps like this one as guidance to identify areas that are likely experiencing flooding; the map may be less reliable over urban or vegetated areas....

NASA's ARIA Team Maps California Quake Damage

July 12, 2019

NASA's ARIA team produced this map of earthquake damage in Southern California from the recent temblors in July2019. The color variation from yellow to red indicates increasingly more significant surface change, or damage. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech, ESA

A week after two strong earthquakes struck near the city of Ridgecrest in Southern California, NASA scientists and engineers continue to analyze satellite data for information on fault slips and ruptures. Their observations are helping local authorities assess damage and will also provide useful information to engineers for designing resilient structures that can withstand ruptures like the ones created by the latest quakes.

The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, created this map depicting areas that are likely damaged as a result of the recent major earthquakes. The color variation from yellow to red indicates increasingly more significant surface change, or damage. The map covers an area of 155 by 186 miles (250 by 300 kilometers), shown by the large red polygon. Each pixel measures about 33 yards (30 meters) across.

To make the map, the team used synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images from the European Space Agency's Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellites from before and after the sequence of quakes - July 4 and July 10, 2019, respectively. The map may be less reliable over vegetated areas but can provide useful guidance in identifying damaged areas....

NASA Maps Surface Changes From California Quakes

July 9, 2019

Damage from two strong earthquakes that rattled Southern California on July 4 and July 5 - a magnitude 6.4 and a magnitude 7.1, respectively - can be seen from space. The epicenter of the quakes was near the city of Ridgecrest, about 150 miles (241 kilometers) northeast of Los Angeles. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the 7.1 quake was one of the largest to hit the region in some 40 years.

The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, used synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from the ALOS-2 satellite to produce a map showing surface displacement from the earthquakes. The post-quake imagery was acquired on July 8, 2019, and compared with April 8, 2018, data from the same region....

Satellites Image Mozambique Flooding After Cyclone

April 1, 2019

mapTropical Cyclone Idai barreled down on Mozambique on March 14, 2019 - leaving a path of destruction in its wake and triggering devastating floods.

NASA's Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team combined images from several Earth-observing satellites to create flood proxy maps that show the progression of the post-cyclone flooding from March 18, 2019, through March 23, 2019. The spread of flooding is evident in the blue pixels that increase through the several-day period.

Although the data may be less reliable over urban and vegetated areas, these flood proxy maps can be used as guidance by first responders, aid providers and others to identify the most impacted areas....

Satellite Map Shows Deformation Following Alaska Earthquake

December 7, 2018

mapScientists with the Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis project (ARIA), a collaboration between NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and Caltech, also in Pasadena, using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from the European Union's Copernicus Sentinel-1A satellite, operated by the European Space Agency, generated a map of the deformation of Earth's surface caused by the November 30, 2018 magnitude 7.0 earthquake beneath the Anchorage area of Alaska, US.

Full article is availalbe at:  http://spaceref.com/earth/satellite-map-shows-deformation-following-alaska-earthquake.html

 

 

 

Assisting Those Fighting the California Wildfires on This Week @NASA

November 17, 2018

Data from space are informing those fighting the California wildfires, a U.S. commercial resupply mission launches to the space station, and showcasing the powerhouse for our Orion spacecraft … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA!

 

See the full "This Week at NASA" video

NASA's ARIA Maps California Wildfires from Space

November 12, 2018

mapCalifornia continues to be plagued by wildfires — including the Woolsey Fire near Los Angeles and the Camp Fire in Northern California, now one of the deadliest in the state's history. NASA satellites are observing these fires — and the damage they're leaving behind — from space.

The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, produced new damage maps using synthetic aperture radar images from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellites. The first map shows areas likely damaged by the Woolsey Fire as of Sunday, Nov. 11. It covers an area of about 50 miles by 25 miles (80 km by 40 km) — framed by the red polygon. The color variation from yellow to red indicates increasing ground surface change, or damage.

Read the full article at:  https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/nasas-aria-maps-california-wildfires-from-space/

 

Updated NASA Damage Map of Camp Fire from Space

November 19, 2018

map

As firefighters continue to battle the destructive Camp Fire in Northern California, the Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, has produced a new map showing damage as of Nov. 16.

The map was developed using synthetic aperture radar images from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellites operated by the European Space Agency. The map covers an area of 48 miles by 48 miles (78 by 77 kilometers), outlined in red on left. A closeup view of damage to the town of Paradise is inset on right, outlined in white. The color variation from yellow to red indicates increasingly more significant changes in the ground surface.

Read the full article at: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/updated-nasa-damage-map-of-camp-fire-from-space

 

NASA's ARIA Maps Indonesia Quake, Tsunami Damage

October 5, 2018

mapA 7.5-magnitude earthquake on Sept. 28 in northern Indonesia and the devastating tsunami that followed it killed more than 1,400 people and left a large trail of destruction. This map, produced by NASA's Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team, shows that damage. The map covers an area of about 42 by 44 miles (67 by 70 kilometers), shown by the red polygon. Each pixel measures about 33 yards (30 meters) across. The color variation from yellow to red represents increasingly more significant ground surface change, or damage likely caused by the earthquake and tsunami.

Full article available at:  https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=7253

 

 

 

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